Ecotourism: Conservation Friend or Foe?

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At the turn of the century, in the early 1900s, to go on safari meant one would travel to the far corners of the world, armed with the guidance of an indigenous tracker and large caliber rifle.  It is no secret that the rich and royal killed hundreds of animals during a single trip to Africa, India, or Indonesia, and… Read more »

WVU Helps Grad Student Follow Dream

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Tina Dow is passionate about a variety of things – traveling, scuba diving, rock climbing – but her one true love will always be elephants. After earning her bachelor’s degree in animal and nutritional sciences from West Virginia University in 2002, Dow spent the next four years trying to find her true career calling. “I interned with several zoos and became a licensed wildlife… Read more »

For The Love Of Elephants: WVU Davis College Helps Grad Student Find, Follow Research Dreams

Tina Dow is passionate about a variety of things – traveling, scuba diving, rock climbing – but her one true love will always be elephants. After earning her bachelor’s degree in animal and nutritional sciences from West Virginia University in 2002, Dow spent the next four years trying to find her true career calling. “I interned with several zoos and… Read more »

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Revisited

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How many times have we heard the phrase,”Reduce, Reuse, Recycle?”  Since the inauguration of the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle or 3Rs campaign in the mid 80s the green movement to better our planet has become a global effort.  There are now receptacles for recycling glass, plastic, aluminum, and paper in office buildings, schools, and shopping centers.  Most cities have a curbside… Read more »

White-nose Syndrome: Silent Killer of America’s Bats

Growing up as a kid in the Northeastern United States I was enthralled by the night sky; watching hundreds of bats hunt winged insects with deadly precision.  As if it happened only yesterday, I can still remember the sound of the tiny chirps and pips of the bats as they communicated to each other and located prey.  Sadly, in my… Read more »

Elephants Know How To Co-Operate

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By Victoria Gill Science and nature reporter, BBC News In the test, two animals had to work together – each pulling on a rope in order to tug a platform towards them. Elephants’ apparent grasp of the need to co-operate shows, scientists say, that they belong in an “elite group” of intelligent, socially complex animals. Researchers from the University of… Read more »

Chytrid Fungus and the Global Decline of Amphibians

Recently, I had the privilege of spending time with a biologist studying the impact of the chytrid fungus on amphibian populations, as well as some of the beautiful Panamanian Golden Frogs (Atelopus zeteki) in her study.  Chytrid is a type of fungus that is exclusively found in water or in moist environments.  Although there are over 1,000 identified chytrid species… Read more »

Wildlife Products: When the Demand Stops, the Killing Stops

As a kid, I remember having several brightly colored rabbit foot key chains given to me as good luck tokens.  Traveling through the south eastern United States, it is still commonplace to see stuffed baby alligators, or the preserved severed heads of juveniles, for sale at welcome centers and gift shops.  Baby sharks with an icy death stare, glaring out… Read more »

Human-Wildlife Conflict

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To most of us, looking out our window and seeing wildlife up close would be a dream come true.  However, to those people who actually share space with magnificent wild creatures on a daily basis the dream can quickly turn into a nightmare.  Human-wildlife conflicts are continuing to increase globally at an alarming rate.  Some argue that wildlife populations are… Read more »

Bushmeat Threatens All Wildlife

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The international demand for bushmeat is thriving.  By definition, bushmeat is any wild animal that is killed for human consumption.   The wild animals are usually protected species, i.e., primates, reptiles, elephants, hoof stock, pangolins, etc., that are obtained from protected areas illegally via snares, poison, and unregistered guns.  Although bushmeat is taken at times to feed starving families living… Read more »